How to Attract Birds to Your Backyard


| 8/20/2013 9:29:00 AM


Tags: birds, bird watching, wildlife, hummingbirds, crabapple, Jacob's ladder, agastache, firebird, honeysuckle, Ernie Allison,

If you are a friend of feathered visitors, love the diversity of the specimens found in your area, the palette of colors they display and love listening to their melodic sounds, there’s some good news: You have many ways to lure specific fowl into your garden and make them feel at home. Besides setting up bird feeders with the appropriate food and offering water, you can influence their arrival in other ways.

How to Attract Birds to Your Backyard

First, you want to make sure the area you are targeting for the birds is low-traffic so they aren’t constantly disturbed. This means no opening/closing doors and not a lot of walking by. Start by determining what breed of bird you are looking to attract. Each one has its preferences and knowing what they are can help you conclude how to make it more interesting for them to visit you.

willow flycatcher
Willow flycatcher; Photo By Kelly Colgan Azar/Flickr

Tyrant flycatchers, such as the Western Kingbird or the Willow Flycatcher, love plants that attract smaller insects, which they feed off, such as crabapple and Jacob’s ladder. They also love berries. A mulberry tree would be a huge bonus for them. However, they do love seeds as well, so setting up that bird feeder would be sure to get you some quality observation time.

rufous hummingbird
Rufous hummingbird; Photo By Rick Leche/Flickr

If you are more interested in the dainty hummingbirds i.e. Black-chinned Hummingbird, Calliope or Rufous Hummingbird, you should plant Agastache, also known as Firebird. Another hummingbird magnet is the honeysuckle. These are just a few examples of the plants that attract hummingbirds. Setting up a hummingbird feeder in a strategic position, possibly in close proximity to one of these plants, will help to keep them coming back even after the plants have ceased producing nectar.  The good thing about hummingbirds is that they remember where they found food they liked and will be back next year to entertain you.

naturehillsnursery
7/15/2014 9:29:27 PM

When we first built our house, I swear there wasn't a bird in sight. Our habitat was poor for them at the time, so I set out to attract them. It took a while, but now I have a wide variety of feathered visitors every day. The article gives some terrific tips, but I would add to have a variety of locations for food and nesting—even near high-traffic areas. I’ve found that over the years, birds acclimate to having people around, so now I can sit on my front porch and have even the shyest of birds stop by for a visit from time-to-time. Feeders don’t have to be elaborate. I have used several of these types of feeders. They’re easy to move around and quick to fill. http://www.naturehills.com/carriage-light-seed-feeder-antique


zara
5/28/2014 3:33:07 AM

This post is very helpful. I like the chirping of birds in the morning. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umZWr2vn72s





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