Bolted Vegetable Flower Arrangements


| 8/19/2015 12:25:00 PM


Tags: Vegetable Garden, Flowering Plants, Flower Arrangement, Uses for Vegetable Flowers, Dill, Chives, Leeks, Cilantro, Radishes, Liz Baessler,

Has your garden gotten away from you? It happens to the best of us. You go on vacation and when you get back your lettuce is a foot taller and flowering. And so is your spinach. And your cilantro.

Some vegetables are only meant to grow in cooler temperatures, so when the height of summer hits, they react to the heat and bolt: They get tall and leggy and produce flowers and seeds. And then they die. It doesn’t mean you’ve failed as a gardener. It just means you’ve witnessed the entire life cycle of a plant.

dill

Vegetables that produce their seeds in fruit, such as tomatoes, squash and peas, flower earlier in their lives and will often continue to flower if the fruit is picked. For leafy greens and root vegetables that don’t produce fruit, however, their traditional harvest period is all just warming up for the big show. As far as the plant is concerned, those tasty leaves are just there to gather energy for the real objective: pollination and seed production. If you want to try your hand at collecting seeds, you should leave your plants in the ground until they start to wither and brown before harvesting them.

If its flowers you’re after, however, pick with abandon! Pick them at their peak and arrange them in vases around your home. You can also dry them by hanging them upside down in a shady, airy place, so you can keep them arranged in a dry vase for much longer.

Cilantro gets especially impressive when it flowers, and it keeps its smell. Put it in a vase in your kitchen for delicate white flower clusters and the occasional waft of deliciousness.




elderberry, echinacea, bee hive

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