A Sense of Place

Indiana’s Stream Cliff Herb Farm is a thriving enterprise that maintains a family’s heritage of both ­living on and making a livelihood from the farm.


| December/January 1999


Like Brigadoon rising from the mist, Stream Cliff Herb Farm may at first seem a bucolic apparition, a large red brick farmhouse surrounded by colorful gardens suddenly appearing on a bend in a country road among the verdant fields and modest hamlets of southern Indiana. But no mirage this, although there is a bit of magic in the place, to say nothing of a close affiliation to rural life more than a century and a half old.

In a world where people readily move across the country, leaving family and friends behind, Stream Cliff’s owners, Betty and Gerald Manning, provide an opportunity to experience an abiding connection to the land and the community. Perhaps it is this that draws some 20,000 visitors a year to the farm as much as it is the gardens, the tearoom, the classes, and the plants, antiques, crafts, and garden paraphernalia for sale here.

This is a place of history woven with family and a love of working the soil. A place where you can sit a spell under a tree beside a burbling brook or watch the morning mist rise from the pasture beyond a split-rail fence surrounding a ­riotous mixture of flowers and herbs. A place where neighbors have pitched in to help Gerald transform a dilapidated outbuilding into a cozy classroom, where a daughter produces mouth- watering herb-flavored dishes for lunch and ­afternoon tea and a son helps raise a wide range of herbs, garden flowers, and native trees and shrubs.

“Our family has deep roots in growing plants; our children are the fifth generation of plantsmen at our farm,” explains Betty. “Stream Cliff is a place where past and present are intertwined in a colonial farmstead atmosphere. Gardening is one of the greatest blessings one encounters on the pathway of life, and we enjoy sharing that at Stream Cliff.”

Making their mark

Stream Cliff has been in the family since 1867, when Betty’s relatives bought the Federal house constructed of clay bricks made on the property. Betty, who grew up on a nearby farm, always wanted to live here. She got her wish in 1965 when she and Gerald, newly married, moved into the antique-filled house surrounded by mature oaks, maples, locusts, and pines as well as peonies, irises, roses, daffodils, and rose-of-Sharon shrubs. Betty and ­Gerald decided to keep these reminders of previous generations as they imprinted their own mark on the property.





mother earth news fair 2018 schedule

MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR

Next: April 28-29, 2018
Asheville, NC

Sit in on dozens of practical workshops from the leading authorities on natural health, organic gardening, real food and more!

LEARN MORE



Subscribe today and save 58%

Subscribe to Mother Earth Living !

Mother Earth LivingWelcome to Mother Earth Living, the authority on green lifestyle and design. Each issue of Mother Earth Living features advice to create naturally healthy and nontoxic homes for yourself and your loved ones. With Mother Earth Living by your side, you’ll discover all the best and latest information you want on choosing natural remedies and practicing preventive medicine; cooking with a nutritious and whole-food focus; creating a nontoxic home; and gardening for food, wellness and enjoyment. Subscribe to Mother Earth Living today to get inspired on the art of living wisely and living well.

Save Money & a Few Trees!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. You’ll save an additional $5 and get six issues of Mother Earth Living for just $14.95! (Offer valid only in the U.S.)

Or, choose Bill Me and pay just $19.95.




Facebook Pinterest Instagram YouTube Twitter


Copyright 2018, All Rights Reserved
Ogden Publications, Inc., 1503 SW 42nd St., Topeka, Kansas 66609-1265