Hot Buckwheat Porridge with Apple and Dried Cranberries Recipe

Use almond milk to make this healthy, gluten-free breakfast.



From "The Almond Milk Cookbook"
April 2016

Total Hands-On Time: 20 min

Preparation Time: 4 min

Cook Time: 16 min

The Almond Milk Cookbook: Over 100 Delicious Recipes (Book Publishing Company, 2015) by Alan Roettinger embraces the growing trend of almond milk by providing easy recipes that incorporate this flavorful milk alternative. Breakfast ideas, main dishes, and desserts are all covered in this cookbook, including nutritional information.

Buckwheat isn’t related to wheat; in fact, it’s not even a true grain. Instead, it’s a gluten-free, pyramid-shaped, grain-like seed related to sorrel and rhubarb. The outer husk of the buckwheat groat is inedible, but the inner fruit is very nutritious, providing all the essential amino acids.

Hot Buckwheat Porridge with Apple and Dried Cranberries Recipe

Ingredients:

• 3 cups water
• 1/3 cup toasted buckwheat groats (kasha)
• 1/3 teaspoon sea salt
• 1 teaspoon coconut oil
• 1 apple, cut into bite-sized pieces (peeling optional)
• 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
• 1 cup plain almond milk or Basic or Sweet Almond Milk
• 1/4 cup dried cranberries
• 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions:

1. Put the water in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat.

2. Add the buckwheat and salt. Decrease the heat to medium and cook for 7 minutes, stirring occasionally. Drain in a strainer.

3. Put the oil in a medium saucepan and heat over medium-high heat until melted.

4. Add the apple and cook, stirring almost constantly, until very lightly browned, about 4 minutes.

5. Add the cinnamon and stir for a few seconds. Add the buckwheat, almond milk, cranberries, and vanilla extract. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil.

6. Decrease the heat to medium and cook, stirring frequently, until thickened, about 5 minutes.

Chef’s Note: First cultivated in Southeast Asia thousands of years ago, buckwheat eventually traveled west and became rooted in Eastern European cuisine, taking center stage in many classic dishes. Buckwheat groats are highly digestible and have a mild flavor, but when they’re toasted or roasted, the flavor becomes quite robust. The groats can be cooked like rice and used for salads and side dishes or added to soups and stuffings. Buckwheat can also replace rice or any other grain in casseroles or pilafs.

Per serving: 620 calories, 8 g protein, 10 g fat (4 g sat), 134 g carbohydrates, 719 mg sodium, 468 mg calcium, 14 g fiber

Read more from The Almond Milk Cookbook: Health Benefits of Almonds


Reprinted with permission from The Almond Milk Cookbook: Over 100 Delicious Recipes by Alan Roettinger and published by Book Publishing Company, 2015.