9 Ways to Avoid Toxins in the Kitchen


| 7/18/2011 12:28:22 PM


Tags: Kristen Conn, Mighty Nest, BPA, plastic, PVC, Teflon, nonstick cookware, PFOA, aluminum cookware, kitchen, microwave safe plastic,

Kristen ConnDedicated to the safety and health of her family and others, Kristen Conn founded  MightyNest to share her knowledge and educate others about simple ways they can create a safe, nontoxic home for their families.  

After spending considerable time choosing organic produce and preparing nutritious food for our families, it can be pretty frustrating to learn that the products we are using to cook, bake, eat and store food with may actually put our families’ health at risk. Materials such as Teflon, BPA, lead, aluminum, phthalates and melamine are commonly found in everyday kitchenware products yet have been tied to disturbing health issues.  The good news is there are many safer alternatives as well as things to avoid.

1. Avoid plastic whenever possible when it comes to food and beverage. Hard plastics can contain BPA, which is a developmental, neural and reproductive toxin. Scientists have linked very low doses of BPA exposure to cancers, impaired immune function, early onset of puberty, obesity, diabetes and hyperactivity. It can be transferred from plastic into food and drink. A recent study found that even BPA-free plastics contain synthetic chemicals which can migrate into food.

2. If you do use plastic in the kitchen, follow these plastic guidelines: Choose BPA-Free, PVC-free plastic labeled #2, #4 and #5. Do not heat plastic in the microwave (“microwave-safe” only means that the plastic won’t actually melt—the extreme heat of the oven will increase transference of chemicals.) Do not store fatty, greasy or acidic foods in plastic. Do not use scratched, badly worn or cloudy plastics for your food and beverages. Hand-wash plastics to avoid wear and tear. Avoid hard plastic melamine dishes. They are made by combining the chemical melamine with formaldehyde (which is a known human carcinogen). Studies have shown that formaldehyde can leach from dishware.

3. When it comes to food storage, safer materials include: glass, 304 grade stainless steel, food-grade silicone—all of which do not leach chemicals into your food.

MightyNest kitchenware 




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