Pet corner: Help for Hyperactivity

Calm your hyperactive pets


| January/February 2001



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It’s important to accept a certain amount of hyperactivity in pets, but natural remedies can help.


Whenever I think about the term “hyperactive,” I’m immediately reminded of two powerful statements that have been the cornerstone of everything I do in my holistic practice:

“In the beginning of all things, wisdom and knowledge were with the animals, for Tirawa, the One Above, did not speak directly to man. He sent certain animals to tell man that he showed himself through the beasts, and that from them, and from the stars and the sun and the moon should man learn . . . all things tell of Tirawa.”
—Eagle Chief Letakots-Lesa,
Pawnee Tribe, late 1800s

“We believe that the animals were sent here to accept our diseases and show us how to heal them.”
—Tis Mal Crow, Native American “root doctor” and author of Native Plants, Native Healing (The Book Publishing, 2001)

Given the onslaught of potentially damaging medicines being used today to treat hyperactivity in children (and recently in dogs), I think it’s important to return to these maxims and apply them, using the teachings of our four-legged companions to help us with our understanding and treatments for hyperactivity in our kids and our animals.

What is hyperactivity?

In human medicine, children who have difficulty concentrating, are not good at following directions, fidget constantly, find it hard to sit still, and are easily bored are often termed hyperactive, or diagnosed as having attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). When the hyperactivity component is lacking, as is often the case in girls, the term for a purer attention-deficit disorder (ADD) is applied.





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