How To: Grow Lavender Plants


| 3/23/2010 2:43:28 PM


Tags: How To, Lavender, Tips, Container Gardening, Patsy Bell Hobson,

Patsy Bell HobsonPatsy Bell Hobson is a garden writer and a travel writer. For her, it's a great day when she can combine the two things she enjoys most: gardening and traveling. Visit her personal blog at http://patsybell.blogspot.com/ and read her travel writings at http://www.examiner.com/x-1948-Ozarks-Travel-Examiner. 

Lavender attracts butterflies, is drought and heat tolerant and grows well in gardens and containers. Both flowers and foliage are fragrant. The blue-purple flowers on silver foliage make this a must-have plant in a white- and silver-themed garden, or a blue- and purple-themed garden. Its upright habit make lavender a good choice for butterfly- and cutting-gardens. Lavender is a good choice in most any herb garden.

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Attract birds, butterflies and pollinators to your garden with lavender.
Photo by DayBreak Lavender Farm

Jody Byrne, founder of DayBreak Lavender Farm says “Lavender is the Swiss Army Knife of herbs. It can be used in crafting, cosmetics, fragrance, cooking, healing and homekeeping.”

“We couldn't say that about oregano, for example. No offense oregano! Lavender is truly the most beloved herb in the world. Its scent is pure and clean, neither masculine nor feminine. And it grows nearly all over the world. Not at the ice caps. Not in the humid jungles. But most everywhere else ... and it grows wild. Which gives you a clue that it is no diva in the garden,” says Byrne.

Like any new plant, you need to give lavender plenty of water and attention until its roots are well established. Herbs in containers will be dependent on you to provide plenty of water year round. Once lavender is established in your herb garden, plants will need to be pruned every year.

amery koho
3/25/2013 9:18:56 PM

I have planted my Lavender in a pot and the first time that I tried to grow it it didnt work out so well so the next year i bought more hardy plants and planted them in the same pot. Well winter has come and is on its way out and i have left the pot out all winter and have just brought it in from out side. It is still cold out where i live but i was told that if i bring it in and leave it where it is warm that it should start to grow. Now i didnt cut anything back before winter started and now that i have brought it inside i am wondering if i should cut the old dead plant way or should i just leave it until i see some new growth. please help as i love this plant and dont want to have to start over again ^_^





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