Growing Herbs in Texas: Clearing Herb Beds for Spring


| 1/25/2010 3:14:23 PM


Tags: Growing Herbs In Texas, Cynthia Meredith, Spring, Spring Cleaning, Beds, Tips,

C.MeredithMy goodness, where does the time go? It seems I just wished everyone a happy and prosperous new year. Now it's almost the end of the month. It seems like spring is just around the corner. After the very cold weather from a couple of weeks ago, the warmer temperatures are most welcome. From my vantage point at local farmers' markets I know a lot of people had plants frozen back or lost plants altogether in the recent cold snap here. As I, and lots of other gardening folks have written in the last few weeks, don't be in a hurry to cut back the dead branches from your plants. That mass can help protect the plants in the next freeze... and, yes, I'm sure we will experience another bout of freezing temperatures before spring sets in for good.

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Lushious and green curly parsley after the freeze.

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Hardy arp rosemary and Santa Cruz oregano looking good after the freeze.

It is time, however, to start cleaning up garden beds and preparing for new plants in the garden. If, like me, you've allowed that pesky Coastal Bermuda to invade your beds, now is the time to dig it out.

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Dormant Coastal Bermuda invaded this bed. 

Sadly, chemical herbicides (i.e. Round Up©) just don't work long term on Coastal. The best way I know to deal with it is to dig as much as you can out. Now it's mostly dormant, so it should be easier to dig. Then mulch, mulch, mulch!!! I've been using the layered newspaper technique, which really works well but is a bit of work.




elderberry, echinacea, bee hive

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