Why Sage is a Superfood

Sage has showed a high level of antioxidant activity against oxidative stress in liver cells. Learn more about sage's superfood effects.


| February 23, 2011



2-25-2011-sage bundle

Used with permission from Superfoods: The Healthiest Foods on the Planet by Tonia Reinhard, $24.95 paperback, Firefly Books, 2010. The following excerpt can be found on Page 162. 

Salvia officinalis 

In a Nutshell 

ORIGIN: Southeastern Europe and Asia Minor
SEASON: Summer; available year-round
WHY IT’S SUPER: Good source of vitamin K; contains phenols and flavonoids
GROWING AT HOME: Easy to grow in the home garden

What’s in a Serving of Dried Sage
(2 teaspoons/1.4 grams)
CALORIES: 4 (18 kJ)
PROTEIN: 0.2 grams
TOTAL FAT: 0.2 grams
SATURATED FAT: 0 grams
CARBOHYDRATES: 0.9 grams
FIBER: 0.6 grams

The genus name of this herb comes from the Latin word for “save,” and over the centuries sage has been used to treat a wide range of diseases. To the Romans, it was a sacred herb and its harvesting included rituals; the Greeks used it to treat snakebites. The scientific name of the plant refers to the fact that in ancient times it was often the official sage of the apothecary.





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