Super Diet, Super Immunity

Stay healthy this winter. Revamp your diet to boost your immune system.


| September/October 2009



blackberry smoothie

Blackberries are among nature's richest sources of antioxidants.

Photo By Joe Lavine

We live in a germy world, where potentially serious flu outbreaks are valid concerns. At this time of year, it’s good to start revving up your immune system so you can make it through the winter with as few colds and flus as possible. Many factors—including stress reduction, adequate exercise and plenty of sleep—play a role in keeping the immune system strong, but one of the most easily controlled and important factors for staying healthy is diet. When you put nutritious foods into your body, you reap the rewards.

Load up on vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, seeds and legumes, and cut way back on immune-suppressing sugars, alcohol, caffeine and chemicals. Vegetables and fruits are nutritional powerhouses that contain protective compounds such as chlorophyll (found in green veggies); lutein (in spinach, peas and romaine lettuce); lycopene (in cooked tomatoes); carotenoids (in carrots, yams and leafy greens); anthocyanidins (in berries, cherries and red cabbage); and sulfur compounds (in broccoli, garlic and onions). Eating at least five to nine servings of vegetables and fruits each day will ensure you’re consuming plenty of these compounds and will get you on your way to the best diet possible, reducing your risk of cancer and heart disease while boosting your immune system.

Tofu Breakfast Scramble 

This hearty vegetarian breakfast (my mother’s specialty) provides a delicious source of protein and several vegetable servings. Substitute six scrambled eggs for the tofu if you’d like. The scramble tastes great with a side of garlicky Roasted Red Potatoes or whole-grain toast. Or top it with salsa for a bonus dose of lycopene.

Roasted Red Potatoes 

Baked red potato quarters make a delicious and classic breakfast side, but they accompany lunch and dinner equally well. Baking instead of frying makes the dish lower in fat and red potatoes are a good source of potassium and vitamins B6 and C. 

tariq mohd asghar
10/9/2012 8:29:04 PM

we should know,and try to use all herbs remedies available in home.any one knows any thing should guide to each other,like mother earth living.






elderberry, echinacea, bee hive

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