How to Make Your Own Chicken Stock


| 9/26/2013 10:25:00 AM


Tags: stock, chicken stock, make your own chicken stock, homemade, Jennifer Rose,

I love soup. It’s a fact. Another fact? The base to a great soup is a great stock to get it started. Good stock can be a building block for you in your kitchen. I found it is way easier, more cost-effective and healthy to make your own chicken stock rather than buying it at a box store. When I realized it was so easy, I found myself asking “Why did it take me this long to figure this out?” We live. We learn. Sometimes we learn the hard way, right?


Making your own chicken stock is easy and economical. Photo By Jennifer Rose.

The start to making your own chicken stock is to find yourself a really good (preferably local) whole chicken. It is so important to know where your food comes from, to know that it is properly taken care of before feeding it to your family. Next week I plan to visit a bunch of local farms on a farm tour here in Chattanooga, and I am so excited to meet some of the local farmers and see how they raise and grow the food that we eat! I hope to get some good gardening tips and new ideas that I will, of course, share with you.

OK, OK. Back to the bird. If your bird needs all that yucky stuff pulled out of the inside, this is the time to go ahead and handle that end of things. My mother would call these parts the “innards.” I will admit, that’s not my favorite part of the day. I prefer to cook my chicken “low and slow” all day long in the Crock-Pot. If you would prefer to use a large stock pot and put it on the stove, that is fine too. Either way works. I love my Crock-Pot so I use it regularly for this. I put as many herbs and spices in with the bird as I can. This gives it TONS of flavor. Not only will it yield great chicken—which can be used for some yummy sandwiches (stay tuned for those recipes!)—it will also help to flavor the soups that you make using the stock.

I tend to put 2 to 3 tablespoons of butter in with the bird. I cover it with just enough water so that it is submerged completely. Sometimes I will substitute the water for a beer or white wine of my choice to add a little flavor in. That is totally preference, but it does help to add some flavor.

lemon, thyme and garlic on wooden cutting board
Getting prepped! Photo By Jennifer Rose. 




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