Mother Earth Living


Eagle Street Rooftop Farm: The Future of Urban Agriculture

Can urban agriculture help cities produce their own food? Annie Novak and the team at Eagle Street Rooftop Farm have set out to prove it can.



Eagle Street Rooftop Farm in Brooklyn overlooks lower Manhattan’s famous skyline.
Photo By Tim Nauman
Veteran New York Botanical Garden gardener Annie Novak heads up a team of employees, volunteers and apprentices.
Photo By Tim Nauman
Radishes are among the crops for sale at Eagle Street’s Sunday farm market.
Photo By Tim Nauman
The farm’s rabbits produce fertilizer, which adds to the farm’s extensive composting project.
Photo By Tim Nauman
“We need to grow high-quality, organic food in all regions, and there is room for growing food in buildings, on buildings and around buildings,” said Green Roofs for Healthy Cities President Steven Peck.
Photo By Tim Nauman
The farm sells its produce and flowers, along with honey, pesto, hot sauce and other value-added items at its market on Sunday afternoons in the growing season.
Photo By Tim Nauman
Although a green roof can cost double or triple what a standard roof would cost, Eagle Street reduced costs by using volunteer labor and reclaimed materials.
Photo By Tim Nauman
Eagle Street is run by a small staff along with volunteers and apprentices. Many city dwellers relish the chance to participate in the production of their own food.
Photo By Tim Nauman
In 2010, Eagle Street Rooftop Farm produced 30 varieties of organic and heirloom fruits and vegetables.
Photo By Tim Nauman

















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