2010 Predictions: Interior Design Trends

http://www.motherearthliving.com/The-Good-Life/2010-predictions-interior-design-trends.aspx

When making any predictions about what 2010 holds, we just can’t discount the economy. Once again, economic uncertainty will play a role in shaping how Americans live. Here’s how this plays out in the way we’ll nest.

1. We’ll go warm. 

FSC-certified furniture from Berkeley Hills
Make sure your wood furniture comes from Forest Stewardship Council-certified sources, like this Zama dining table from Berkeley Mills. Photo Courtesy Berkeley Hills. 

Seeking comfort, people will move away from dark, cold woods and stone in favor of warmer colors such as honey and caramel.

2. Textiles will be bold and bright. 

ikat decor
Add unexpected color to throw pillows with a bold ikat print. Photo By Posh Living, LLC/Courtesy Flickr. 
 

Geometric prints in bold patterns—herringbone, ikats and bargello—will take the spotlight. We’ll see more of these on environmentally friendly, organic fabrics. (Maybe it’s time to reupholster using one of these hot prints.)

3. We’ll spruce up with bright, natural colors. 

turquoise home decor
Bring nature indoors with a splash of bright, beautiful turquoise. Photo By coco+kelley/Courtesy Flickr.
 

Color authority Pantone has named turquoise its color of the year for 2010. Turquoise combines blue’s serenity with green’s invigoration, soothing us and restoring our sense of well-being. This will be the year of bright, saturated colors, such as turquoise, which spice up quiet spaces while still drawing inspiration from nature. (Make sure to use low-VOC paint if you’re splashing on new color.)

4. We’ll let more sunshine in. 

daylighting
Incorporating natural daylight into home design will be popular in 2010. Photo Courtesy E.J. Meade.
 

Designing with natural light was a strong trend in 2009 that is predicted to continue in 2010. Opening up your home to natural light will not only reduce your dependency on electricity but can also raise your spirits.

5. Rugs will go minimal. 

Goodweave fair-trade workers
Purchase chic rugs from socially responsible companies. Look for the Goodweave label to ensure your new rug wasn't made by children. Photo By Robin Romano/Courtesy Rugmark.
 

Messy, shaggy rugs that trap and hold dirt and dust mites are out. Flat, woven rugs are in. If you’re in the market, make sure yours isn’t made by a child. Choose one certified by RugMark International, a nonprofit organization that fights child labor practices. Its GoodWeave label addresses social and environmental issues as well.