For Your Health: Fertility Enhancing Herbs

http://www.motherearthliving.com/Natural-Health/for-your-health-fertility-enhancing-herbs.aspx

K.PriebeGetting pregnant is not as easy as popular culture makes it out to be. According to the National Survey of Family Growth by the CDC, infertility affects about 7.3 million women and their partners. This number is extraordinary and can be frustrating when couples want to conceive. Herbs might be able to help.

Caution: It’s not recommended to take infertility drugs and herbal remedies at the same time. It is also not recommended to take numerous herbs all at once. Pick and choose which is best for you after talking with your health-care provider.

Black CohoshHerbs That Help with Infertility:  

Black Cohosh. This herb is an antispasmodic, which is known to relieve cramping. Women who want to conceive are recommended to take this herb in the first half of their cycle from menstruation to ovulation.

Red Raspberry Leaf. This herb can be taken throughout the entire cycle because it is known to strengthen the uterine lining. Red raspberry is not necessarily a good herb to use once pregnant but is useful for helping with hormonal imbalances. It’s also high in calcium.

Vitex (Chaste Berry). This herb is referred to as the female herb and is used to regulate hormones. It should be taken throughout the entire cycle or the first half from menstruation to ovulation.

Treat Male Infertility with Herbs  

• Take astragalus extract. This herb is believed to stimulate sperm.
• Try using ginseng. It is reported to increase testosterone and sperm count.

Treat Female Infertility with Herbs 

• Purchase a false unicorn root from a health food store. It is known to provide hormonal balance and stimulate ovulation naturally.
• Use lady’s mantle once per day to help with menstruation and support uterine growth. This will help provide the best environment for implantation.

Check out more information about infertility from The Herb Companion. 

Black cohosh photo: Photo by Wayne National Forest/Courtesy Flickr