Horseradish Recipes: Aïoli with Horseradish

February/March 2011
http://www.motherearthliving.com/Cooking-Methods/aioli-with-horseradish.aspx



Photo by Howard Lee Puckett

The most famous garlic mayonnaise is the aïoli of Provence. This aïoli makes an exceptional dipping sauce for crisp-tender asparagus, carrots and cauliflower; for steamed artichokes; and for raw radishes, celery and fennel. It is good with cold steamed mussels, scallops and shrimp, and for grilled vegetables, meat, poultry and fish, or as a sandwich spread. MAKES ABOUT 1 CUP.

• 1 or 2 fresh garlic cloves, thinly sliced
• 1 extra-large egg yolk
• About 1 tablespoon lemon juice
• About 3⁄4 cup olive oil
• Salt and freshly ground pepper
• About 1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
• 1 to 2 tablespoons freshly grated horseradish root

1. With a pestle, pound sliced garlic to a paste in a porcelain or marble mortar; there will be some small bits that do not completely break down. If you don’t have a mortar and pestle, mince the garlic very fine, then mash it well with the flat of a cleaver or large knife.

2. Stir egg yolk into the garlic paste and loosen the mixture with the lemon juice. Add the oil drop by drop at first, stirring continually. After about 1⁄4 cup of oil has been added, drizzle the oil in a thin stream, stirring continually. When the aïoli has emulsified, season with salt and pepper, and more lemon juice if desired. Stir in mustard and horseradish.

3. Store the aïoli in a tightly covered glass jar for up to a week. The flavor is best when the aïoli is fresh, but any that’s left over (doubtful) is good in salads.

Note: To make the aïoli in a food processor, add garlic to the processor and pulse a few times, then add egg yolk and lemon juice. Drizzle oil through the feed tube in a thin stream until the aïoli emulsifies. Season with salt, pepper and lemon juice. Stir in the mustard and horseradish until just combined.


Susan Belsinger is a long-time herbal enthusiast who wrote Dill, Herb of the Year 2010 for the International Herb Association. 

To read more, see the International Herb Association’s book, Horseradish, Herb of the Year 2011, edited by Susan Belsinger. To purchase, visit www.iherb.org or write to Marge Powell at the International Herb Association, P.O. Box 5667, Jacksonville, FL 32247-5667. 

Click here the main article,2011 Herb of the Year: Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana).