Healthy Home
Make your home a safe haven with efficient design, chemical-free cleaning methods and home organization tips.

DIY Luminous Leaf Jar

Pressed autumn leaves transform a traditional glass bottle into a luminous vessel.

Papier Mache Ghostly Lanters

Guide trick or treaters and other friendly spirits to your front door this Halloween with these easy-to-make papier mache ghostly lanterns.


Browse more great healthy home content in the Mother Earth Living archives.

Fall Home Comfort

4 Eco-Cleaning Chores for Fall
Tackle these four essential fall cleaning chores to make your home more efficient and comfortable for winter.

5 Festive Fall Decorations
Bring a little autumn cheer into your home with these fun fall decoration tips.

Clean and Refresh Your Home with Fall Scents
Try these warming fall aromas to bring the smell of autumn into your home.

Featured Video

DIY Cleaners with Fall Scents

Learn how to make a homemade air freshener, all-purpose cleaner and carpet freshener with warming oils such as clove, cinnamon, anise and fir.



Backyard Pharmacy helps you choose the best "backyard" medicinal plants. All of the plants can be grown easily by home gardeners throughout North America … and used for their healing and natural-remedy properties! Author Elizabeth Millard shares her deep knowledge of what to add to your garden to grow your own medicine cabinet to enhance your health.

Each featured plant profile includes:

  • A detailed full-color photograph of the plant and key preparation steps.
  • A description and brief history of the plants (including recommended varieties).
  • How to plant, grow and harvest.
  • The parts of the plant to be used.
  • The health and nutritional properties of the plant.
  • Current scientific research on the plant.
  • Any special harvesting, storing or preparation instructions.
  • How to use the plant as a remedy.
  • Any cautions to note.
Richly illustrated with 200 photographs, Backyard Pharmacy not only includes shots of the plants, it also contains images demonstrating key elements of the step-by-step preparation, harvest and storage methods to reap the best results from your gardening efforts.

Take control of your health. Learn about the benefits of herbs and natural health remedies for yourself and your family, and even grow them right in your own backyard.



The beloved Fix-It and Forget-It series has sold nearly 11 million copies, giving home cooks around the world exactly what they crave: recipes for delicious, satisfying meals that anyone can make with simple ingredients and minimal preparation time. Who doesn’t love being able to serve their family a wholesome dinner (and dessert!) without spending hours in the kitchen … or a fortune on groceries? Now, best-selling author Phyllis Good presents a collection that gives cooks even more!

Featuring 550 new, mouthwatering recipes, this book will amaze cooks with the “magic” their slow cookers can perform. In addition to delicious soups, stews and chilis, cooks will also find pizza, cheesecake, bar cookies, quick breads and dozens of other surprising treats!

There are reasons why the Fix-It and Forget-It series is so popular, and this latest book is no exception.

  • Each page is packed with easy-to-follow, carefully tested recipes.
  • No one has enough time these days … but with a slow cooker, anyone can prepare a fantastic meal in minutes!
  • The recipes use ingredients most people already have in their cupboards; there’s no searching high and low for exotic foods that will break the bank.
With 16 pages of full-color photographs and a price that’s tough to beat, this is destined to become a staple on home cooks’ shelves everywhere.



Eating on the Wild Side is the first book to reveal the nutritional history of our fruits and vegetables. Starting with the wild plants that were central to our original diet, investigative journalist Jo Robinson describes how 400 generations of farmers have unwittingly squandered a host of essential fiber, protein, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. New research shows that these losses have made us more vulnerable to our most troubling conditions and diseases: obesity, diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic inflammation and dementia.

In an engaging blend of science and story, Robinson describes how and when we transformed the food in the produce aisles. Wild apples, for example, have from three to 100 times more antioxidants than Galas and Honeycrisps, and are five times more effective in killing cancer cells. Compared with spinach, one of our present-day "superfoods," wild dandelion leaves have eight times more antioxidant activity, two times more calcium, three more times vitamin A, and five times more vitamins K and E.

How do we begin to recoup the losses of essential nutrients? By "eating on the wild side": choosing present-day fruits and vegetables that come closest to the nutritional bounty of their wild ancestors. Robinson explains that many of these jewels of nutrition are hiding in plain sight in our supermarkets, farmers markets, and U-pick orchards. Eating on the Wild Side provides the world's most extensive list of these superlative varieties. Drawing on her five-year review of recently published studies, Robinson introduces simple, scientifically proven methods of storage and preparation that will preserve and even enhance their health benefits:

  • Squeezing fresh garlic in a garlic press and then setting it aside for 10 minutes before cooking it will increase your defenses against cancer and cardiovascular disease.
  • Baking potatoes, refrigerating them overnight, and then reheating them before serving will keep them from spiking your blood sugar.
  • Cooking most berries makes them more nutritious.
  • Shredding lettuce the day before you eat it will double its antioxidant activity.
  • Store watermelon on the kitchen counter for up to a week and it will develop more lycopene.
  • Eat broccoli the day you buy it to preserve its natural sugars and cancer-fighting compounds.

The information in this surprising, important and meticulously researched book will prove invaluable for omnivores, vegetarians and vegans alike, and forever change the way we think about food.