Mother Earth Living

Q and A: Herbs for Low Blood Pressure and Energy

Health professionals answer readers questions about maintaining energy and blood pressure levels.
Mindy Green and Robert Rountree, PhD.
March/April 1997


Content Tools

Related Content

Every Herb Has a Story: Licorice's Health Benefits

Every herb has a story, and that of licorice begins with its reputation as a “sweet herb.” Plants ar...

Microsoft Hohm Application Tracks Energy Use

The new Microsoft Hohm application makes it easy to track your energy use and provides simple recomm...

In The News: Licorice Root May Help Stop Tooth Decay

Researchers may have found the herb to stop tooth decay: licorice root.

Food For Thought: Get Your Kids to Eat Vegetables With These Four Tips

Kids and veggies don’t mix, right? Guest blogger Stephanie Small doesn't buy it. Re-learn a few trie...

In every issue of Herbs for Health, professionals from a variety of health-care fields answer your questions about using medicinal herbs. Herbalist Mindy Green and physician Robert Rountree responded for this issue.

Q&A


I’m a forty-two-year-old female with low blood pressure and no energy. I have a good appetite and walk after dinner for exercise, but I still smoke. I am premenopausal, but about six years ago, I had a partial hysterectomy because of cancer. I also suffer from hay fever.

When I remember, I take vitamin C (2,000 mg a day), B complex (1,000 mg a day), bee pollen, and Siberian ginseng. After reading “Herbal Care for Colds & Flu” in the September/October issue of Herbs for Health, I took schisandra and astragalus to help boost my immune system and fight my husband’s cold germs.

What can I do to build up my energy level and blood pressure?
K.B.
Yanceyville,
North Carolina

If I had to pick one herb for you, it would be licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra). Licorice supports depleted adrenal glands, helps the immune system fight infections and cancer, alleviates allergic symptoms and cough, and helps regulate estrogen ­metabolism to decrease menopausal symptoms.

Finally, it mimics the effects of aldosterone, an adrenal hormone that raises blood pressure. This action can make it unsuitable for use when blood pressure is already high but makes it ideal for your condition.

A starting dose would be 1–2 g daily of the powdered root or 250–500 mg of the solid extract (4:1 concentration). It would be wise to check your blood pressure regularly and adjust the dose accordingly.
—Robert Rountree
 


 Robert Rountree, M.D., is a physician at the Helios Health Center, a multidisciplinary holistic clinic in Boulder, Colorado. He serves on the advisory board for the Herb Research Foundation.

The information offered in Q & A is not intended to be a substitute for ­advice from your health-care provider.

 








Post a comment below.

 








Subscribe today and save 50%

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Subscribe to Mother Earth Living!

Welcome to Mother Earth Living, the authority on green lifestyle and design. Each issue of Mother Earth Living features advice to create naturally healthy and nontoxic homes for yourself and your loved ones. With Mother Earth Living by your side, you’ll discover all the best and latest information you want on choosing natural remedies and practicing preventive medicine; cooking with a nutritious and whole-food focus; creating a nontoxic home; and gardening for food, wellness and enjoyment. Subscribe to Mother Earth Living today to get inspired on the art of living wisely and living well.

Save Money & a Few Trees!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. You’ll save an additional $5 and get six issues of Mother Earth Living for just $14.95! (Offer valid only in the U.S.)

Or, choose Bill Me and pay just $19.95.