Mother Earth Living

Fresh Clips: Mate - More than an Energy Drink

By Steven Foster
October/November 2008


Content Tools

Related Content

How to Find the Best Green Building Materials for Your Deck or Outdoor Space

Building a deck can be a challenge, but building with being “green” in mind can be an even bigger ch...

The World of Tea: Six Tea Recommendations

Discover the tantalizing and aromatic flavors of teas from around the world with some of our guest b...

The Path to Herbalism

The art of healing our bodies with herbs is a new fascination in Erin McIntosh's life. Learn more ab...

Boost Your Immunity with Tea

A recent study reveals yet another way in which tea promotes good health — by boosting the natural a...

Yerba mate, also known as mate, is the caffeinated drink of choice throughout much of South America. Mate leaves are harvested from a holly shrub (Ilex paraguariensis) native to southern South America. Buenos Aires residents often can be seen sipping the beverage from a decorated gourd through a silver straw, or bombilla. The gourd is packed with dried leaves in the morning, hot water is added, and the beverage is drunk throughout the day.

Like chocolate and tea, mate once was thought to be merely a social beverage and stimulant, but new studies have shown yerba mate to offer other potential health benefits, as well.

A recent comprehensive review reveals yerba mate can lower cholesterol, protect the liver and perhaps even help fight obesity. Rich in antioxidants, mate fared better than both red wine and green tea in protecting against nitrosative stress, which can lead to DNA damage and cell death. Additional studies have shown other mechanisms of antioxidant activity that contributed to lowering high-density lipoproteins (“bad” cholesterol), hence helping protect against heart disease.

Controversial studies have linked mate use to increased risk of esophageal and oral cancers, associated with certain processing methods or high consumption. In these studies, however, the amount tested was similar to the average Brazilian consumption (69.79 grams a day, which is nearly 2.5 ounces of dried leaf per day). As a point of reference, the typical American tea bag holds only 1 to 2 grams of dried leaves.

For more information, see Journal of Food Science. 72(9): R138-R151








Post a comment below.

 








Subscribe today and save 50%

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Subscribe to Mother Earth Living!

Welcome to Mother Earth Living, the authority on green lifestyle and design. Each issue of Mother Earth Living features advice to create naturally healthy and nontoxic homes for yourself and your loved ones. With Mother Earth Living by your side, you’ll discover all the best and latest information you want on choosing natural remedies and practicing preventive medicine; cooking with a nutritious and whole-food focus; creating a nontoxic home; and gardening for food, wellness and enjoyment. Subscribe to Mother Earth Living today to get inspired on the art of living wisely and living well.

Save Money & a Few Trees!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. You’ll save an additional $5 and get six issues of Mother Earth Living for just $14.95! (Offer valid only in the U.S.)

Or, choose Bill Me and pay just $19.95.