Mother Earth Living


Take It From Me: Green Remodeling Advice

Sage advice from architects, builders and homeowners about ecological remodeling.



Charles Kingsley and his family chose to sustainably remodel their house in Portland, Oregon, in order to honor the home’s traditional roots while equipping it for today’s modern lifestyle.
Photos by Mike O’Brien/Courtesy Portland Office of Sustainable Development
Architect Rick Harlan Schneider, owner of Inscape Studio, and his wife, Julie, did a green renovation on their Washington, D.C., townhome—built in 1929—that included enclosing the back porch and making it into a sunroom. They used the U.S. Green Building Council’s national standards for energy use, materials, and water as guidelines.
Photo by Dan Redmond
Architect Rick Harlan Schneider, owner of Inscape Studio, and his wife, Julie, did a green renovation on their Washington, D.C., townhome—built in 1929—that included enclosing the back porch and making it into a sunroom. They used the U.S. Green Building Council’s national standards for energy use, materials, and water as guidelines.
When David Johnston added an office to his home, the eco-remodel included structural insulated panels, engineered wood for all large structural beams, durable fiber cement siding, large overhangs to protect the siding from moisture, recycled plastic decking, low-E windows, a ceiling fan, plenty of natural daylight, and Interface carpet.
Photo by Kim Master
Charles Kingsley and his family chose to sustainably remodel their house in Portland, Oregon, in order to honor the home’s traditional roots while equipping it for today’s modern lifestyle.
Photos by Mike O’Brien/Courtesy Portland Office of Sustainable Development
Passive heating and cooling systems work so well in this home—built by Lightworks Construction of Boulder, Colorado, when David Johnston was the company’s president—that the homeowners first thought the heating, ventilation and air- conditioning system didn’t work because it wasn’t turning on.
Photo courtesy What’s Working
When David Johnston added an office to his home, the eco-remodel included structural insulated panels, engineered wood for all large structural beams, durable fiber cement siding, large overhangs to protect the siding from moisture, recycled plastic decking, low-E windows, a ceiling fan, plenty of natural daylight, and Interface carpet.
Photo by Kim Master
Architect Rick Harlan Schneider, owner of Inscape Studio, and his wife, Julie, did a green renovation on their Washington, D.C., townhome—built in 1929—that included enclosing the back porch and making it into a sunroom. They used the U.S. Green Building Council’s national standards for energy use, materials, and water as guidelines.

















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