Mother Earth Living


A Hobbit House

With a historical base, Gary Zuker built his hobbit house with a clay and straw mix.



Gary and a third-generation stonemason hauled boulders to build the dry-rubble foundation, the doorway, and the fireplace. Gary created the window seat out of granite and a cedar log that he found in the nearby woods. His wife, Delores, a stained-glass artist, made the dining room windows.
Photos by Paul Bardagjy
Gary and a third-generation stonemason hauled boulders to build the dry-rubble foundation, the doorway, and the fireplace. Gary created the window seat out of granite and a cedar log that he found in the nearby woods. His wife, Delores, a stained-glass artist, made the dining room windows.
To ensure the best placement, Gary, below left, placed windows after the house was already framed. All the windows in the cottage are either salvaged or handmade by Gary and his wife, Delores. Gary “engineered” the home’s ­scissor-truss system of loblolly pine by choosing boards that looked right and fitting them together. He counted on the strength of the cob walls to allow him some breathing room.
Gary and a third-generation stonemason hauled boulders to build the dry-rubble foundation, the doorway, and the fireplace. Gary created the window seat out of granite and a cedar log that he found in the nearby woods. His wife, Delores, a stained-glass artist, made the dining room windows.
Gary sized and polished the granite for his kitchen counter. The kitchen base cabinet is from a demolished pharmacy; the soapstone surrounding the sink is from benches in a University of Texas building. Gary took advantage of the 18-foot ceilings to build lofts for more space, right. The loft serves as a sitting space and an extra bedroom.
Gary and a third-generation stonemason hauled boulders to build the dry-rubble foundation, the doorway, and the fireplace. Gary created the window seat out of granite and a cedar log that he found in the nearby woods. His wife, Delores, a stained-glass artist, made the dining room windows.
Gary and a third-generation stonemason hauled boulders to build the dry-rubble foundation, the doorway, and the fireplace. Gary created the window seat out of granite and a cedar log that he found in the nearby woods. His wife, Delores, a stained-glass artist, made the dining room windows.
 





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