Mother Earth Living

Easy Winter Recipes: Tips For Drying Herbs

By The Herb Companion staff
February/March 1996


Content Tools

Related Content

DIY: Drying Fresh Herbs

Enjoy your herbs throughout the winter months with these different drying techniques.

7 Tips for Everyday Outdoor Gardening, Part 1

Save time, money and backache with a few of these tips from the first leg of my series on outdoor ga...

Green Your Life: The Benefits of a Clothesline

Save money and energy by ditching the dryer and air drying your clothes instead.

DIY: Make Car Fresheners with Tea Infusers

Tired of those cheap cardboard car air fresheners that are ugly and have a fake, overpowering odor? ...

• Herbs can be dried in any number of ways: by tying the stalks into bundles and hanging them in a dry, well-ventilated place; laying them out on screens to air-dry; or in dry climates, placing them in large paper bags, then shaking the bags several times a day. Good air circulation during drying helps prevent the growth of mold. Small quantities can be dried on an open plate in a frost-free refrigerator or in a dehydrator.

• For best flavor retention, do not dry herbs in a conventional or microwave oven: essential oils volatilize at 85° to 110°F.

• Dry small-leaved herbs, such as rosemary, thyme, oregano, and marjoram, on their stems. Strip the large leaves of basil, mint, sage, and lemon balm from their stems to speed drying.

• To help herbs such as basil retain their bright green color, lay them out in a thin layer between paper towels; stir the herbs at least once a day to aerate them.

• As soon as small-leaved herbs are crispy-dry, gently rub the leaves off the stems. Store all dried herbs in whole-leaf form; don’t crumble, grind, or powder them until you’re ready to use them.

• Store whole leaves in tightly sealed jars in a dark, cool spot or in the refrigerator or freezer, not in a cabinet over the stove where they will be exposed to heat. Hanging bundles of herbs are decorative, but they gather dust and lose flavor rapidly.

• To use dried herbs in recipes that call for fresh, substitute one-third to one-half as much dried herb as fresh. Start with the lesser amount and add more as needed.


Click here for the main article,  Easy Winter Recipes .








Post a comment below.

 








Subscribe today and save 50%

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Subscribe to Mother Earth Living!

Welcome to Mother Earth Living, the authority on green lifestyle and design. Each issue of Mother Earth Living features advice to create naturally healthy and nontoxic homes for yourself and your loved ones. With Mother Earth Living by your side, you’ll discover all the best and latest information you want on choosing natural remedies and practicing preventive medicine; cooking with a nutritious and whole-food focus; creating a nontoxic home; and gardening for food, wellness and enjoyment. Subscribe to Mother Earth Living today to get inspired on the art of living wisely and living well.

Save Money & a Few Trees!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. You’ll save an additional $5 and get six issues of Mother Earth Living for just $14.95! (Offer valid only in the U.S.)

Or, choose Bill Me and pay just $19.95.