Mother Earth Living

Botanical Images: 9 Divine Color Combinations

This slideshow of botanical images demonstrates garden color combinations based on color theory, diverse species and bloom time.
By Ken Druse, Photographs by Ellen Hoverkamp
July 2012
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Natural Companions by Ken Druse, with botanical photography by Ellen Hoverkamp, contains a wealth of horticultural guidance, useful plant recommendations and gardening lore accompanied by gorgeous photos.
Photo courtesy Stewart, Tabori & Chang (c) 2012
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Natural Companions (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2012), by acclaimed garden writer Ken Druse, presents recipes for perfect plant pairings using diverse species that look great together and bloom at the same time. This garden-lover’s guide features more than one hundred special botanical images of amazing depth and color, created in collaboration with artist Ellen Hoverkamp using modern digital photography. The slideshow in this article’s Image Gallery features nine of our favorite images from the book. The following excerpt on color theory is taken from Part Four, “Color.” 

If you go to a public garden or speak to a professional garden designer and ask him or her about color in plantings, you’ll probably get an answer like, “I chose what I like,” or “I was inspired by a famous garden.” Few people will mention color theory. Nevertheless, seeing combinations based on color relationships is another way to discover appealing schemes and guide you to fine-tune color for the effect you’re hoping to realize.

For centuries, visual artists have benefited from a reference tool called the color wheel to help them create harmonious compositions of tones and hues. We gardeners can use it too. After all, a well-composed planting is indeed a work of art.

The basic principles of color theory and design are revealed by the hues relative po­sitions and relationships on the wheel. They are there when you need them: Don’t feel chained to the wheel. These directives are enlightening, but like many sets of rules, they may be followed or broken.

You may want to choose colors that appeared to you in a dream or remind you of a favorite spot you saw on vacation. Carry a camera or snap a shot with your phone. Inspiration is everywhere: the fabric on a pillow, an Oriental rug. Flip through the pages of fashion magazines. Take a trip to a museum—a painting could inspire a scheme. For a planting at the front of the house, consider your home’s exterior and the colors that will look best with that. Look at everything with an eye toward color combinations: the shades, tints, and hues all around us.

Nature is always a good teacher. The woodland has its own palette, as does the sunny meadow. If you feel like putting every color of the rainbow together, do it. And if that Joseph’s coat combination doesn’t look right, edit. Select some potted species and varieties at the garden center, put them together and move them around. This way, you can arrange color schemes before you buy.

Notions of color have been passed along through the years, but I have to say that some of the nicest combinations in the garden happen by accident, and they always will.

Botanical Images: 9 Gorgeous Color Schemes

Visit the Image Gallery for our favorite photographs from Natural Companions, or click on one of the titles below to navigate straight to the listed image.

A Favorite Subdued Combination
Circle of Light
Going Green
On the Darker Side
On the Lighter Side
On the Lighter Side 2
Hue Do You Love
Mono a Mono
Split Complement 

For more on beautiful gardens and garden photography, follow Ken Druse's garden podcast on REAL DIRT, or view more scanner photographs by Ellen Hoverkamp available for purchase as prints at My Neighbor's Garden.

This excerpt has been reprinted with permission from Natural Companions: The Garden Lover’s Guide to Plant Combinations, published by Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2012. 


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