Mother Earth Living

The Magic of Mustard: Lean and Creamy Honey Mustard Dressing

More than just a condiment, this spicy herb is among the world’s favorites for flavor and health.
By Rachel Albert-Matesz
October/November 2007
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Makes 2 1/4 cups
This creamy concoction contains less fat than most bottled and homemade salad dressings.  The secret? Chicken or vegetable broth thickened with arrowroot, flavored with herbs and spices. Try this tangy dressing over tossed green salads or main-course salads that include fish, poultry, red meat, tofu or beans.

Note: Apple fiber powder adds extra thickness to this recipe. Look for it in natural foods stores or order it from Now Foods at www.NowFoods.com.

  • 1½ cups turkey, chicken or vegetable broth (preferably homemade)
  • 1  teaspoon unrefined sea salt (cut to ½ teaspoon if using salted broth)
  • 2  tablespoons arrowroot powder/starch
  • ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil or flax oil
  • ⅓ cup lemon juice (OR ¼ cup brown rice vinegar or raw apple cider vinegar)       
  • ¼ teaspoon ground chipotlé powder (OR black pepper)
  • 1  clove garlic, minced or pressed, optional
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons dry mustard
  • 2  teaspoons apple fiber powder, optional but desirable
  • 2  tablespoons honey
  • 1  tablespoon minced fresh (or 1 teaspoon dried) crumbled oregano, basil or tarragon, optional
  1. In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup of the broth and salt to a boil. Simmer and stir to dissolve the salt.
  2. Dissolve arrowroot in remaining 1/2 cup liquid, then add this to the saucepan. Stir or whisk over medium-low heat until thick and clear, 2 to 3 minutes, then remove from heat.
  3. Allow thickened broth to cool at room temperature for 1 hour, or refrigerate until cool to the touch.
  4. In a blender or food processor, puree the cool broth with the remaining ingredients. Pour into jars, label, cover and refrigerate. Use within three weeks.

Lowfat variation: To reduce fat from 6 to 4 grams per serving, reduce oil to 1/3 cup.

The above recipes are adapted from The Garden of Eating: A Produce-Dominated Diet & Cookbook by Rachel Albert-Matesz & Don Matesz (Planetary Press, 2004).
Rachel Albert-Matesz is a freelance food and health writer, cooking instructor and personal chef who lives in Phoenix. For more information about the book, classes and services, visit
  www.TheGardenOfEatingDiet.com .

Click here for the original article, The Magic of Mustard.








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