Mother Earth Living

Canning and Preserving Herbs: Apple-Lovage Chutney

By Maggie Oster
August/September 1995
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Cooked chutneys are an invention of the British colonials who governed India and are named after the Hin­du­stani word for strong spices, catni. Commercial chutneys usually contain tropical fruits, especially mango, but this version uses temperate-climate fruits. The result retains the traditional sweet-and-sour taste. Besides accompanying Indian dishes, chutneys can be served with roasted or grilled meats, cheese spreads, sandwiches, and salad dressings.

• 6 cups cored and chopped apples
• 1 cup fresh lovage leaves, minced
• 1 medium sweet red pepper, cored, seeded, and chopped
• 1 medium red tomato, cored, peeled, and chopped
• 1 medium green tomato, cored and chopped
• 1 medium onion, peeled and chopped
• 3 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
• 1 cup golden raisins
• 1/4 cup peeled and minced fresh ginger root
• 1 cup light brown sugar, packed
• 1 cup white wine vinegar
• 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
• 1 teaspoon celery seeds

1. Combine all the ingredients in a nonreactive pan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly. ­Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, uncovered, stirring frequently, for 45 minutes, or until thickened.

2. Prepare the jars, lids, and boiling-water bath. Fill the jars with the hot, thickened mixture, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe the rims with a clean towel and attach the lids securely.

3. Place the jars in the boiling-water bath, and when the water returns to a boil, process for 15 minutes. Remove the jars, cool, label, and store.

(Adapted from Herbal Vinegar.)


Maggie Oster writes extensively about herbs, food, gardening, cooking, landscape design, flowers, and crafts. Her books include Recipes from an American Herb Garden (New York: Macmillan, 1993) and Herbal Vinegar (Pownal, Vermont: Storey Communications, 1994). When she’s not on the road, she’s in her garden or kitchen in Indiana or Kentucky.

Click here for the main article,  Canning and Preserving Herbs: 13 Recipes .








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