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8/22/2013

stewed tomatoes

Tomato season has hit Kansas, and our tomato plants are in full production mode—meaning tons of delicious garden-fresh tomatoes in just about everything we eat. But even so, we simply have too many to eat them all right now, and I want to save some of this summer deliciousness for later in the year.

Luckily, we have a food-freezing guide in our July/August issue, so I was ready to preserve some of our ripe fruit. Last year was the first year we had tons of tomatoes and I planned to try my hand at canning, but having a baby in the middle of August squashed those plans. So this is my first year of experimenting with preservation methods. I decided to try the very easy instructions for stewing tomatoes Barbara Pleasant recommended in our Guide to Freezing Food (instructions below).

I thought the peeling part would be a task, but it was actually incredibly easy. After being dunked into a big pot of boiling water, the skins peeled off easily. Then I dumped out the water and put the quartered tomatoes back into my stockpot over medium heat. 20 minutes of cooking and voila—supersimple stewed tomatoes bursting with flavor. I started with probably 30 tomatoes and got six 8-ounce jars of stewed tomatoes. I put them in the freezer this time because I was in a rush. Next time I’m going to try water-bath canning so I don’t have to worry about defrosting before using.

3-Step Stewed Tomatoes

1. Put fresh tomatoes in boiling water for about 30 seconds. Let cool briefly and peel loosened skins.

2. Cut into quarters, put into a large pot over medium heat and add about a cup of water.

3. Cook for 20 minutes, then turn off heat. Let cool, transfer to jars and either freeze or can.

stewing tomatoes


8/14/2013

Last June after the Mother Earth News Fair in Puyallup, Washington, my husband, James, baby, Julian, and I traveled down to Portland. I was going to the home of Cara and Jason Hibbs of Oh, Little Rabbit to photograph them and their home for a feature next spring. We’d booked a place to stay via Airbnb, but we didn’t know the homeowners had a cat and James is allergic, so we had to make last-minute plans. Lucky for us, we were very near The Kennedy School, one of 65 properties in the McMenamins chain of brewpubs, microbreweries, music venues, historic hotels and theaters. 

kennedy school 

For those of you on the West Coast, this is probably old news, but many people around the rest of the country may not have heard of the chain—which is based mainly in Portland but also has locations around Oregon and Washington. The Kennedy School is an old elementary school that’s been converted to a hotel, replete with a movie theater (free to hotel guests but also open to the public), a wonderful restaurant with a gorgeous outdoor courtyard, a heated outdoor soaking pool, a variety of bars including a cigar lounge and more. Each room is decorated with vintage décor with dim lighting via antique chandeliers and heavy wooden headboards (ours was painted with an owl). 

Kennedy room 

Edgefield Room 

Edgefield Pool 

We had such a great time we were sad to have to check out after two nights because they were all booked up. But, luckily for us, there are many more McMenamins locations, so we simply transferred our stuff to Edgefield. In Troutdale (about 20 minutes from Portland), Edgefield was build in 1911 as the county poor farm. It has a vineyard, huge organic gardens, a golf course, and a variety of restored historic buildings. The food—available from four different restaurants on site—is spectacular, the grounds are gorgeous. The rooms don’t include any televisions or phones, but you won’t miss them. Instead, visit the on-site spa and outdoor pool or watch live music at the outdoor pub. You can also watch on onsite glass-blower and potter at work or take in a movie at the on-site theater (family-friendly, the hotel offers a “Mommy Matinee” where kids can come and no one minds a little fussing). 

Golf 

Edgefield flower 

I’m a huge fan of the restoration of old buildings (my book, Housing Reclaimed, is all about homes built from reclaimed materials), so the McMenamins properties were so up my alley. They truly defined our trip to the Portland area and we had so much fun. I highly recommend anyone visiting Portland consider staying at one of these excellent historic properties!  

All photos courtesy McMenamins



8/13/2013

With my herb garden’s bounty in end-of-summer explosion mode, I’ve been experimenting with ways to preserve my herbs. One delicious mode of experimentation I dove into further last weekend—with excellent results—was freezing herbs by way of popsicle. I encourage you to experiment. You have nothing to lose but maybe some less-than-stellar popsicles as the result of your experimentations (even the ones that come out bad are pretty good). I bought a bunch of fruits, picked a bunch of herbs and had a few kinds of organic yogurt on hand. Here are three of our best combinations (did I mention, these are wholeheartedly kid-approved!).

   

J Popsicle 2

Strawberry-Balsamic-Basil Popsicles

Mix about one cup of frozen strawberries with about 1/4 cup white sugar or honey and a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar. Mash the mixture up a little bit and let it sit for 10 to 30 minutes. Add a couple large spoonfuls of vanilla yogurt and about 20 basil leaves and mix with a hand blender (or in the blender). Pour into popsicle molds, let freeze for 4 hours and enjoy.

Cherry-Vanilla-Mint Popsicles

First, de-stem and pit about one cup of dark bing cherries. Combine with vanilla yogurt and about 15 mint leaves. We used spearmint, but you could use any. Blend with a hand blender or in the blender. Pour into popsicle molds, let freeze for 4 hours and enjoy.

Basil Lemonade Popsicles

Squeeze the juice from two whole lemons into a blender or the container of a hand blender. Add about 20 basil leaves and a couple heaping spoonfuls of plain Greek yogurt. Add about 1/4 cup sugar, then keep adding to taste. Once you’ve achieved the sweetness you want, pour into popsicle molds, freeze for four hours and enjoy.



7/31/2013

If your garden is anything like mine, you are dealing with a basil explosion right about now. Basil is one of my favorite herbs, but no matter how much Caprese salad or pesto I make, it seems there is always more than I know what to do with. So I’ve been looking into good ways to use and preserve my supply. Here are a few favorites:

1. Basil Popsicles

To me, basil screams summer. And what goes better with summer than popsicles?? Search the internet, and you’ll find a huge variety of yummy-sounding recipes. This one from the blog Deliciously Organic yields a fresh and tasty treat that includes fresh basil, raw honey and organic yogurt. 

Basil

Get the recipe to make these delicious treats from the blog Deliciously Organic!

2. Basil Beverages

For my friend’s strawberries-and-cream-themed bachelorette party early this summer, we made these delicious strawberry-basil-champagne cocktails that were a huge hit. Ever since, I’ve been obsessed with basil beverages. They come in many varieties, are amazingly refreshing, and seem fancier and more complicated than they really are. 

basil  limeade

This recipe for basil limeade is perfect for summer.

3. Frozen Basil

When I’ve made all the basil recipes I can think of, I turn to preserving this summertime treat to enjoy all year. Last year, I exclusively froze basil as pesto—delicious, but somewhat more labor-intensive than I’d like for a superquick preservation job. This year I’ve made some pesto to freeze, but more frequently I’ve been taking the easy route: Chop some fresh basil, mix it with some olive oil, blend briefly with the hand-mixer and pour into ice-cube trays. If I’m feeling extra lazy, I will just chop the fresh herb, put it in ice-cube trays, cover with a bit of water and freeze. This winter, I will just pop the herb cubes into sauces, soups or casseroles for some summer flavor.



3/27/2013

Kaitlin Jones, president of Living Whole Foods and mom of three young kids, sent me this recipe the other day and I had to share it! Vegan and chock-full of vitamins, this tasty meal is perfect for a weeknight family dinner. Try it and let us know what you think! 

cashew alfredo recipe
Cashew Alfredo Pasta

Ingredients:

• 1 cup raw dry cashews
• 2 1/2 cups water
• 1 1/2 tablespoons onion, divided
• 1/4 red bell pepper, chopped
• 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast
• 4 cloves minced garlic, divided
• 1 tablespoon miso
• 5 mushrooms, sliced
• 1 to 2 tablespoons coconut oil
• Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
• Your favorite noodles

Preparation:

1. In a blender or food processor, blend cashews until they are finely ground.

2. To the cashews in the blender, add water, 1 tablespoon onion, bell pepper, nutritional yeast and 3 cloves of garlic and blend until smooth, creating the sauce.

3. Pour cashew sauce into a sauté pan over medium heat.

4. In a separate pan, sauté the remaining 1/2 tablespoon onion, 1 minced clove of garlic, miso and sliced mushrooms in coconut oil for about 5 minutes.

5. Mix sauté into sauce, season with salt and pepper, and serve over your favorite noodles! Serves five. 



3/14/2013

I love St. Patty’s Day mainly because it’s the first holiday of the year during which we might be blessed with warm, springy weather here in Kansas. I’ve often been known to take the day off work and go downtown to watch the parade, then to my favorite outdoor music venue, where they always have bands playing all afternoon, along with green beer and traditional Irish dishes. With a nursing baby, this year I probably won’t be indulging in much Irish ale, but I am still hoping to celebrate the day with a few Irish favorites. Luckily, we have three excellent St. Patrick’s Day recipes in our archives.

Sweet Potato Colcannon
1. Sweet Potato Colcannon

Made with sweet potatoes, leeks and collard greens, this yummy take on the traditional dish offers high levels of vitamins A, C and K—plus plenty of fiber. Bonus: It only requires six ingredients (plus salt and pepper)!

Get the recipe


2. Herby Beer Bread

Infused with Guinness and topped with lavender, rosemary and mint, this hearty bread offers a nonalcoholic way to enjoy dark, bold Irish beer.

Get the recipe

Asparagus Spears in Phyllo

3. Asparagus Spears in Phyllo

OK, so this one isn’t Irish at all, but with the start of spring comes asparagus season, so I think we could make a wonderful new tradition out of eating asparagus at St. Patrick’s Day get-togethers. This easy recipe makes a perfect finger-food... plus, it’s green, right? If you prefer not to make the mint aioli dipping sauce from scratch (although it will taste so good), just bruise some fresh mint leaves, chop them up and add them to store-bought mayo.

Get the recipe



2/5/2013


Last summer, we featured a list of 14 sustainable food companies you can trust , which we compiled with the help of GoodGuide, a company that rates the health, environmental and social aspects of companies. We asked GoodGuide to use its rating system to devise a list of food producers that are independently owned, create a wide range of healthy products and do their part to benefit the world, both ecologically and socially. When they came back with their list, Plum Organics was one of the top scorers.

At the time, I was pregnant, so I was overwhelmed with choosing baby prep gear—not worrying about baby food, which seemed a far distant concern. Fast forward almost a year and my baby is now 6 months old (!!!) and starting to try a few foods (so far, bananas and sweet potatoes).

Great timing, then, that Plum’s PR department just so happened to send out a sample pack of its “Just Veggies” line for babies ages 4 months and up. As his second food was sweet potato and he’d already had some pureed potato we cooked up at home, the Just Sweet Potato veggie blend was a perfect thing to give him. And he loves it!

But more important, here are a few reasons I love it:

  • Plum Organics features fruits and veggies that are gently cooked and minimally processed.
  • They’re all certified organic and have no high-fructose corn syrup, trans fats, artificial ingredients or GMOs.
  • They’re packaged in BPA- and phthalate-free packaging.
  • Their manufacturing and transportation processes focus on waste and energy reduction.
  • The company tries to source as much food domestically as possible.
  • The foods are unsweetened and unsalted.
  • Even the “just veggies” are mildly flavored with herbs (peas with mint and squash with cinnamon!), giving babies the chance to expand their palates. The “Second Blends” include interesting pairings designed to help babies become adventurous eaters (Sweet Potato, Mango and Millet; Zucchini, Banana and Amaranth; Blueberry, Pear and Purple Carrot—yum!)

So, after trying the free samples I’m lucky to get from time to time as an editor, I’m thinking, OK, so how much do these wonder convenience foods cost (this was not part of our article last summer). The answer? A very reasonable $9 for a six-pack at Target.com. I’m sure many of you already know all about Plum Organics, but I wanted to share my latest baby find.

(Of course, I’m still going to be making a lot of foods at home. Here are a couple favorite recipes if you’re more of a maker than a buyer.) 





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