Mother Earth Living

Smart Parenting

Practical advice about raising children


4/19/2012
Tags:

 safe makeup 

Lately I have been looking for make up that is free of potentially harmful chemicals.  Feeling and looking beautiful should not come with the price tag of our health.  It’s important for makeup companies to know that we want beauty products that don’t hinder our wellbeing in any way.  I vote with my money, and will purchase products that are free of: 

 

  • Benzophenones (oxybenzone) – Can have photoallergic reactions and is a hormone disrupter. 
  • Paraben (butylparaben, ethylparaben, methylparaben, propylparaben) – The most widely used preservative in cosmetics and personal care products.  It can mimic estrogen in the body, may disrupt hormones and possibly increase the risk of breast cancer.  (see this video - http://envirocancer.cornell.edu/research/endocrine/videos/makeup.cfm) 
  • Phthalates – A chemical additive that can disrupt the endocrine system, mimic estrogen, cause thyroid problems, allergies and asthma. 
  • Sulfates (sodium laurly sulfate SLS or sodium laureth sulfate SLES) – This thickening, lathering agent is a skin irritant (despite being used in products that you put on your skin!) and can mimic estrogen.  SLS has been linked to cancer causing carcinogens. 

A resource is the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep Cosmetics Database.  Just type in your make up brand and it will give you the lowdown on that product http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/  My complaint with this site is that it does not state why some products don’t get better marks than others.  So, use it.  But sometimes question how they came to their conclusions. 

Here’s what is in my makeup bag!  I am very happy with all of these products: 

  • Zuzu liquid eyeliner 
  • Gabriel foundation 
  • Mineral Fusion lipstick 
  • Badger lip tint & shimmer 
  • Pacifica Hawaiian Ruby Guava perfume 

 

 



4/2/2012

Faith MoserFaith Moser is the creator of eco ike {organic baby t’s + cookbooks full of yummy, healthy and quick recipes for kids and grown-ups}! If you want your kids to grow, live, eat & play green, visit ecoike.com.  

Board games are a great addition to structured play! They combine entertainment and education into one fun experience, and it’s the perfect activity on a rainy day or when there’s time to fill and your kids are saying, “I’m bored.”  

board games for kids 

Simple lessons such as taking turns, learning to win and lose, and communication intermixes with lessons about anything from math to astronomy (depending on the game you choose). There are endless options for children’s games. Choose ones that are age-appropriate and that would be of interest to your child. 

There are so many great games on the market today, but these five made our “must play” list! 

  • Uno: This classic is a favorite for so many reasons! It’s super fun, fast-paced, easy to play and it teaches kids simple (but important) lessons such as colors, numbers, matching and order. It’s also super portable making it a great game to bring on any trip. 
  • Trouble: This game is so much fun for all ages! I love playing this with my 9-year-old nephew. The bubble can lead to trouble or victory, all depending on how things shake down. Great skills like counting and taking turns make this game fun and definitely worth playing. 
  • Bananagrams:Bbuild connecting words! You win when you’ve used all of your letters. It’s a fast-paced and fun way for beginning spellers (and established spellers) to test their skills or show off their quick wit with words. 
  • Connect Four: Literally connect four pieces in either a horizontal, vertical or diagonal direction. Tic-tac-toe-ish in nature, this game reinforces counting, color recognition and strategy. 
  • Checkers: An oldie and a goodie! Kids learn reasoning, logic and pre-math skills with this classic. It’s a must-play and a wonderful game that your child can play with any adult and as a grown-up.


4/2/2012
Tags:
coconut banana carrot cake


4/2/2012
Tags:

Who doesn’t love sugar? It’s one of the most delicious ingredients in the food world… but unfortunately, it is also is one of the unhealthiest! Our beloved sweetener is void of any nutritional quality and worst of all, is linked to diabetes, depressed immune systems and obesity. According to Pediatrician, Dr. Kavey, “The reason that we think of it as a problem is because of the big rise in obesity in childhood, and that rise has occurred over the same time period that there’s been a major increase in the amount of simple sugar that children consume.

The American Heart Association recommends eating no more than 5 percent of total calories from sugar and that children should have no more than 3 teaspoons a day and teens should consume no more than 5 to 8 teaspoons daily. Considering that one can of soda contains approximately 10 teaspoons of sugar and 1 cup of children’s sweetened cereal has roughly 5 teaspoons of sugar, it’s pretty safe to say that most families are exceeding the recommended daily sugar intake!

Knowing that an excess of sugar is not good for us, what can parents do? Here are four steps to consume less of the sweet stuff:

Be sure to read labels! You wouldn’t think that a company is putting sugar in your marinara sauce, peanut butter, crackers or soup, but they are. They are also doing in it obscure ways. You are looking out for “sugar” on labels and food companies are sneaking them in with murky words like: barley malt, cane juice crystals, carob syrup, corn syrup, corn syrup solids, dextran, dextrose, diatase, diastatic malt, ethyl maltol, fructose, fruit juice, fruit juice concentrate, glucose, glucose solids, high fructose corn syrup, lactose, malt syrup, maltodextrin, maltose, mannitol, refiner’s syrup, sorbitol, sorghum syrup, sucrose. Basically, anything ending with, “-ose” is a sugar. Know the sugar lingo! One of my golden rules with food products is that if I do not know what the ingredient is, I pass on the product!

Know that “healthy”sugars (honey, molasses, maple syrup & agave) are still sugars! They all have added nutrients and would be the preferred sweetener choice. Honey contains minerals, amino acids and B Vitamins. Molasses contains iron, calcium, potassium and magnesium. Maple syrup contains zinc, manganese and potassium. Agave contains small amounts of calcium, potassium and magnesium. Even though they are not stripped down of all their nutrients, these sweeteners basically break down in the body the same way that sugar does. They may have some added nutrients, but once digested they are basically seen as sugar by the body.

Modify family-favorite recipes! An easy way to omit or reduce sugar consumption is by modifying recipes. When possible, omit sugar in savory dishes. When it comes to baking, try reducing the sugar by tablespoons or 1/4 cup. You can compensate the lack of sugar by adding another dash of cinnamon or your favorite spice. Baked goods are not as adaptable as savory dishes, so some trial and error may be involved.

Start a food journal! I know that families barely have time to sit down for breakfast, let alone write in a food journal, but the best way to reduce sugar is to be aware of the sugar being eaten on a daily basis. Once you are conscious of how much is being consumed, you may realize that the family’s daily intake is far more than you realized. A quick notation of the food & sugar content can be a great tool to see how quickly and frequently you are consuming sugar.



3/27/2012
Tags:

 Our children’s easy, go-to breakfast on weekday mornings are organic cereal bars. They love them and request them every day. After a little label reading it became very clear why they love them so much! They are LOADED with sugar. I am trying to reduce our family’s sugar intake, so I decided to come up with a cereal bar alternative that was low in sugar and high in protein and nutrition (and of course, deliciousness!). This breakfast cookie fits the bill! It is so scrumptious that they are almost addictive. They also are far more nutritious than the average cereal bar sold everywhere. Made with almond flour, oats, walnuts, cherries and chunks of dark chocolate, this recipe will quickly become a family favorite! Feel free to tinker with your families personal preferences! Replace the cherries with cranberries, dates, raisins or banana chips, or the chia seeds with flax, pumpkin, sunflower or sesame seeds.  

 
Who knew that a breakfast bar alternative could be this tasty and good for you! 
 
½ cup butter, melted 
2-3 Tablespoons honey 
2 organic eggs 
½ teaspoon vanilla 
1 cup almond flour 
1 teaspoon cinnamon 
¼ teaspoon ginger 
¼ teaspoon cloves 
½ teaspoon baking soda 
¼ teaspoon baking powder 
1 cup oats (I use Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free) 
¾ cup dark chocolate chips 
1/3 cup dried cherries 
1/3 cup unsweetened coconut 
1/3 cup walnuts, broken in half or quarters (I like them chunky, but cut to your preference) 
2 teaspoons chia seeds 
 
1.) Preheat oven to 350°. 
2.) In a large mixing bowl, mix the butter, honey, eggs and vanilla. Add the almond flour, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, baking soda and baking powder until just combined. Add the oats and stir until just combined. Add the chocolate chips, cherries, coconut, walnuts and chia seeds until just combined. 
3.) Using a small scooper, drop onto a parchment-lined baking sheet, spacing 2 inches apart. Lightly flatten the dough. 
4.) Bake for 11-12 minutes. Once cooled, store in an air-tight container. I pop most of these in an air-tight freezer container. 12 seconds in our microwave will thaw and warm them.  
 


3/27/2012
Tags:

If you are looking to eat less sugar, I have got an alternative that might be a good fit for your family. Since going sugar-free (for the most part) our families main go-to sweetener has been stevia. Here’s the lowdown on stevia and how to use it:

stevia

First the bad news about stevia:

• It does NOT taste just like sugar. It’s sweet and very concentrated, but it has a somewhat, faintly-licorice aftertaste. When baking with it, the aftertaste can easily be masked and you will only pick up the “sweetness” of stevia. But when putting it directly in a cup of tea or coffee, you will notice the aftertaste. So it’s best to use it when the flavor can be covered with other ingredients.  

• It is expensive compared to sugar. A good quality stevia (and only buy good quality brands!) such as Sweet Leaf, Now & Kal will cost approximately $6-$12.

Now the good news:

• It is an herb (a member of the of the chrysanthemum family). If you have a green thumb, try adding this herb to your garden.

• It has a zero glycemic index and zero calories. Personally, I am not concerned about calories but I am about the glycemic index (I would rather experience a low glycemic response from food).

• Stevia is very concentrated and much sweeter than table sugar (when baking, it is estimated that you need 1 teaspoon of stevia to replace 1 cup of sugar. When it comes to replacing stevia with sugar, you will need to fidget with your favorite recipes to get it just right).

• It is heat stable and can easily be used for cooking and baking. It takes some time to adjust to the reduced volume compared to sugar and to the taste difference. I try to bake primarily with stevia (and/or honey — I sometimes use 1/2 stevia and 1/2 honey). I now consider this my go-to sweetener in our household.

• Stevia companies such as Sweet Leaf are making flavored liquid stevia drops to use in everything from your morning coffee to baking. The drops come in flavors such as chocolate, chocolate raspberry, lemon drop, peppermint, root beer, vanilla crème and hazelnut.Sold at your local co op, whole foods or natural food store.



3/19/2012
Tags:

 Chocolate trumps every dessert in our household. So I know that this apple crisp recipe is a winner because every time that I make it (which is pretty frequently because it’s super easy & delicious!), I hear “ooh”, “awe” and “awesome”!  

 
Granny smith apples get topped with a brown sugar crumb topping… it’s scrumptious and extra tasty served warm with vanilla ice cream. 

 

6 cups peeled apples, thinly sliced*
3/4 cup brown sugar
2/3 cup oats
1/2 cup flour
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1 Tablespoon cinnamon

1.) Preheat oven to 350°.
2.) Place apples in a lightly buttered 8x8 glass baking dish.
3.) Combine brown sugar, oats, flour, butter and cinnamon; blend together with fingers until crumbly. Evenly top apples with oat mixture.
4.) Bake for 35 minutes.

* we use granny smith apples, but any apple will do :)
 




Subscribe today and save 50%

First Name: *
Last Name: *
Address: *
City: *
State/Province: *
Zip/Postal Code:*
Country:
Email:*
(* indicates a required item)
Canadian subs: 1 year, (includes postage & GST). Foreign subs: 1 year, . U.S. funds.
Canadian Subscribers - Click Here
Non US and Canadian Subscribers - Click Here

Subscribe to Mother Earth Living!

Welcome to Mother Earth Living, the authority on green lifestyle and design. Each issue of Mother Earth Living features advice to create naturally healthy and nontoxic homes for yourself and your loved ones. With Mother Earth Living by your side, you’ll discover all the best and latest information you want on choosing natural remedies and practicing preventive medicine; cooking with a nutritious and whole-food focus; creating a nontoxic home; and gardening for food, wellness and enjoyment. Subscribe to Mother Earth Living today to get inspired on the art of living wisely and living well.

Save Money & a Few Trees!

Pay now with a credit card and take advantage of our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. You’ll save an additional $5 and get six issues of Mother Earth Living for just $14.95! (Offer valid only in the U.S.)

Or, choose Bill Me and pay just $19.95.