Roses: Easy Two-Step Method for Rose-Infused Vinegar

Rose-infused vinegar can add variety to salads, sauces, mayonnaise and vegetables.

Rose Infused Vinegar

Use rice wine vinegar or white wine vinegar to make rose-infused vinegar.

Photo by Lilyana Vynogradova

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After choosing your flowers and vinegar, you are ready to make your infused vinegar. Use clean, sterilized canning jars, pint or quart. Fill the jars about halfway full of the flowers of your choice; rinse the flowers first if necessary and spin or pat them dry.

Pour the vinegar into the jar, leaving 1/2-inch headspace, and seal. I purchase the plastic canning lids to use when making vinegars and tinctures, since a metal lid will corrode from acid or alcohol. If you do not have these, place a layer of plastic wrap over the rim of the jar before screwing on a metal lid. Place out of sunlight for two to four weeks. I put mine on the kitchen counter and shake it every day.

If using red rose petals, the vinegar will turn bright ruby red within a few hours or overnight. After the suggested time has passed, strain the vinegar through cheesecloth, and pour into clean bottles. Label them and store away from light.

Susan Belsinger loves immersing herself in all things herbal and looks forward to researching, growing, cooking and photographing each new Herb of the Year. 

To read more about roses, see the International Herb Association’s book, Rose, Herb of the Year 2012, edited by Susan Belsinger. To purchase, visit The International Herb Association website.  

Click here for the main article, 2012 Herb of the Year: The Rose (Rosa spp.).